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Historic Attractions


Kentucky has a lot of history in the development of this country. Our story is rich and our land is full of important sites that honor where we've been and how fare we have come. If you're interested in exploring the history of this great land, check out this list of sites to see.
Historical Attractions
Ashland, Henry Clay Estate
Ashland, Henry Clay Estate
Ashland is currently closed to the public, but you can still schedule private tours of 10 or more on weekdays during February. Contact us at 859-266-8581 ext. 204 to make your reservation today! We will open to the public on our regular schedule March 1st. Thank you!
Historical Attractions
Cane Ridge Meeting House
Cane Ridge Meeting House
Open to anyone in keeping with its original design as “a house of prayer for all people,” Cane Ridge continues to extend its welcome. Here, countless thousands have worshiped in groups, large and small, or alone, have sat quietly for meditation. To be assured that you are welcomed and space is available when you wish to bring a group to Cane Ridge, contact the curators ahead of time to schedule the visit. If your requested date is available, the curators will confirm the date and reserve the time on the calendar.

Historical Attractions
Duncan Tavern
Duncan Tavern
The Duncan Tavern Historic Center is the headquarters of the Kentucky Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Duncan Tavern Historic Center offers meeting and banquet facilities giving you several options for private entertainment that comes with historic ambiance. Tours of the Museum are available at 10:30 & 1:30 Wednesday-Saturday, April through mid-December.
Historical Attractions
Henry Latrobe Pope Villa
Henry Latrobe Pope Villa
Born and trained in England, Latrobe emigrated to the United States in 1795 and became one of America’s first professional architects. In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson appointed Latrobe surveyor of public buildings, responsible for the continuing design and construction of the White House and the U.S. Capitol. The most talented designer of the new republic, Latrobe developed an American neoclassical architecture of elegantly austere exteriors which contained interiors rich in variety and event. Tours of Latrobe's Pope Villa are available by appointment only by calling the BGT at (859) 253-0362 or by email at info@bluegrasstrust.org

Historical Attractions
Hopewell Museum
Hopewell Museum
Historic Paris-Bourbon County/Hopewell Museum is a dynamic and committed group of volunteers who care about Bourbon County’s heritage and who share that interest and knowledge with their community. HPBC and Hopewell Museum serve the geographic region of Bourbon County, its neighboring Kentucky counties, plus traveling visitors from around the world.
Historical Attractions
Hunt Morgan House
Hunt Morgan House
Completed in 1814 for John Wesley Hunt, the house stands as a reminder of early-19th century Lexington when the city was known as "The Athens of the West." The house, situated on the southwestern corner of Gratz Park, is in the Federal style and exhibits elegant proportions and remarkable craftsmanship. The house museum offers a tangible link to the past, through which visitors are able to learn about the highs and lows of Lexington's history.

Kentucky Governor's Mansion
Kentucky Governor's Mansion
Kentucky's Governor's Mansion It is a proud symbol of Kentucky's history and has served as home to the state's governors since 1914. The Mansion is one of only a handful of executive residences in the United States to be open to the public for tours. Thousands of visitors from across the Commonwealth and around the world visit the Governor's Mansion every year. Contact the Capitol tour desk to schedule a visit soon.
Historical Attractions
Liberty Hall Historic Site
Liberty Hall Historic Site
Liberty Hall Historic Site serves as a learning center that engages the public in exploring the history, politics, social and cultural life of early Kentucky through the homes, gardens, documents, and artifacts of Senator John Brown and his family.

Historical Attractions
Mary Todd Lincoln House
Mary Todd Lincoln House
Discover America’s most fascinating first lady! Mary Todd Lincoln was sophisticated, educated, and versed in politics. On the surface, her success in the White House seemed assured. Yet, few women in American history have endured as much controversy and tragedy. Tour her childhood home to explore the full story.
Historical Attractions
Old Governor's Mansion
Old Governor's Mansion
The Old Governor's Mansion, also known as Lieutenant Governor's Mansion, is located at 420 High Street, Frankfort, Kentucky. It is reputed to be the oldest official executive residence officially still in use in the United States, as the mansion is the official residence of the Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky.

Historical Attractions
Old State Capitol Building
Old State Capitol Building
The Old State Capitol building (1830-1910) was the setting for lively political debates as lawmakers grappled with such issues of the day as slavery and war. Today it is restored to the way it looked in the early 1850s and contains pieces original to that time. A young Gideon Shryock, the state’s first native-born professionally trained architect, designed this Greek Revival building. It is the third one to have served as Kentucky’s seat of government.
Historical Attractions
Orlando Brown House
Orlando Brown House
The Orlando Brown House is located within Kentucky's Liberty Hall Historic Site. Kentucky's Liberty Hall Historic Site serves as a learning center that engages the public in exploring the history, politics, social and cultural life of early Kentucky through the homes, gardens, documents, and artifacts of Senator John Brown and his family.

Historical Attractions
Vess Lindsey House
Vess Lindsey House
The Vest-Lindsey House, located in Frankfort's historic Corner of Celebrities neighborhood, is clearly one of Frankfort's oldest homes, possibly dating from 1800 to 1820. Owners of the property made important changes to the house over the years. Originally constructed in the Federal style, the Vest-Lindsey house took on many Victorian features as did many homes of the time. The Commonwealth of Kentucky obtained the house in 1965. Since then, two major renovations have occurred and have returned the house back to an approximation of its original appearance.
Historical Attractions
Ward Hall
Ward Hall
Ward Hall, completed in 1857, is considered one of the nation's finest Greek Revival-style mansions. Ward Hall's center hallway is dominated by a copy of George Peter Alexander Healey's 1860 portrait of Sallie Ward, a celebrated Kentucky belle of her day. Open 1-6 p.m. First Weekend of the month and holidays. Special tours are always available by appointment.

Historical Attractions
Waveland Historic Site
Waveland Historic Site
Guided tours of Waveland historic site focus on the everyday lives of family and slaves who lived and worked at Waveland in the 1850s.
Historical Attractions
White Hall, Cassius Clay Estate
White Hall, Cassius Clay Estate
White Hall State Historic Site was the home of Cassius Marcellus Clay, 19th century emancipationist, politician, newspaper publisher, Ambassador to Russia, and friend to Abraham Lincoln.

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